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Establishing your digital research identity goes hand-in-hand with a deep understanding of your discipline and the collaborative networks you will forge throughout your academic career. You can use digital tools to uniquely identify you and your research, enable you to navigate funder ID and University systems, increase your research impact, and build your credibility in the scholarly communications and publishing environment.

In this topic, we'll explore why and how to obtain an ORCID and a ResearcherID, and how these unique identifiers can be linked with other identification systems.

To kick us off, it's a warm welcome to Dr Anthony Dona, Solutions Consultant with Clarivate Analytics who will explain why it's important to disambiguate yourself in today's publishing environment.






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ORCID is an international, interdisciplinary, open, and not-for-profit registry of unique researcher identifiers. It
is a hub that connects researchers and research outputs. An ORCID identifier (or ORCID) is an Open Researcher and Contributer ID, a persistent digital identifier able to be integrated with key research workflows and systems, such as manuscript and grant submissions.

You can obtain an ORCID identifier in three easy steps

To find out more about ORCID, watch this short introductory video.


How can an ORCID iD benefit you?


  • ORCID is a single identifier that is used by the major citation services, publishers and increasingly funders to help identify individual researchers (including Web of Sciences and SCOPUS)
  • ORCID enables researchers to be associated with the publications, grants and awards that are theirs, reduces confusion over similar names, and prevents others claiming their research
  • Funders are increasingly requiring an ORCID, so researchers will need one for grant applications (yes, coming to an ARC and NHMRC near you)
  • Publishers are requiring an ORCID for manuscript submission and author/reviewer databases. See: ORCID Integration Chart
  • ORCID helps researchers automatically build their publication lists – generally a single click of a button aggregates publications to their profile.

You can also promote yourself by adding your ORCID to your resume, thesis, web page, email signature, business cards and anywhere else you have a public profile. Here's an example email signature block that includes an ORCID.

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To get the most out of your ORCID, check out the Library's Libguide; Six Things to Do Now You’ve Got an ORCID iD or follow the ORCID blog.

Researcher ID


ResearcherID provides a single number that also solves the author ambiguity problem within the scholarly research community. Researchers can apply for a single unique identifier to enable you to manage your publication lists, track citations and h-index, identify potential collaborators and avoid author misidentification.

In addition, your ResearcherID information integrates with the Web of Science and is ORCID compliant, allowing you to claim and showcase your publications from a single one account. Search the registry to find collaborators, review publication lists and explore how research is used around the world!

Watch the following video to discover how to create a free ResearcherID.



How can a ResearcherID benefit you?


  • ResearcherID is a single identifier that is used by the major citation services, publishers and increasingly funders to help identify individual researchers
  • ResearcherID enables researchers to be associated with the publications, grants and awards that are theirs, reduces confusion over similar names, and prevents others claiming their research
  • Some publishers require a ResearcherID for manuscript submission and author/reviewer databases.
  • ResearcherID helps researchers automatically build their publication lists – generally a single click of a button aggregates publications to their profile.

Next up, watch how your ORCiD and ResearcherID can be used in the Web of Science, including to claim your publications.




Top tips

  • You can choose what information to make public in ORCiD and ResearcherID.
  • In ORCID you can import your publications from Web of Science ResearcherID, Scopus Author ID and other researcher profile tools.
  • In ResearcherID you can upload items that you have authored, provided that they are in the RIS format.

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In this first topic you've discovered digital tools to uniquely identify you, your research and claim your publications. Follow the next arrow to move ahead and find out how to build your digital research profile.



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